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  • Can Wine be Good for Your Liver?

    Wine is one of the oldest drinks known to man. It is a staple of many Mediterranean diets. It is the pride of winemaking families from New Zealand to Italy to France to Sonoma. As of late, it has been discovered that red wine in particular is a heart-healthy drink. Now there’s a new finding coming to the fore. Wine may be good for the liver. It’s an interesting twist when we usually equate alcohol with liver problems. So what’s the deal?

    UC San Diego School of Medicine researchers released a study showing that modest wine consumption, defined as one glass a day, may not only be safe for the liver, but may actually decrease the prevalence of Non-Alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease (NAFLD).

    Science Daily reports:

    The study, which appears in the June 2008 issue of the journal Hepatology, showed that for individuals who reported drinking up to one glass of wine per day, as compared to no alcohol consumption, the risk of liver disease due to NAFLD was cut in half. In contrast, compared with wine drinkers, individuals who reported modest consumption of beer or liquor had over four (4) times the odds of having suspected NAFLD.

    NAFLD is the most common liver disease in the United States, affecting over 40 million adults. Previous research has shown that as many as five percent of adults with NAFLD will develop cirrhosis. The major risk factors for NAFLD are similar to many of the risk factors for cardiovascular disease obesity, diabetes, high triglycerides, and high blood pressure. Multiple studies have shown that modest alcohol consumption may reduce the risk for heart disease. However, recommendations for modest alcohol consumption in individuals at risk for cardiovascular disease have overlooked that these same people are also at an increased risk for NAFLD. Thus, there exists a dilemma as to whether modest alcohol consumption for the heart is safe in regards to the liver. The UC San Diego investigators sought to clarify this important question.

    The study was funded in part with grants from the National Institutes of Health National Research Service Award (NIH NRSA) and from the National Center for Research Resources of the National Institutes of Health for the General Clinical Research Center at UC San Diego.

    IMPORTANT NOTICE: Statements are made based on independent food science research and have not been evaluated by the FDA. Information contained herein are for educational purposes only and are not to be used for or in place of proper medical diagnosis and care under a qualified physician. Always check with your physician before using any product for contraindications and proper use.

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